4 ways to get your child to pack their own lunchbox

As parents, we are responsible for packing lunchboxes each school day - about 200 times every year. Add that up over 8 years of schooling (pre-school/primary) and you're facing more than 1,600 lunchboxes per child!

Keep reading to find out how you can share this responsibility with your child. Not only will this reduce your workload but a child who is involved in the process of preparing healthy food is more likely to eat it!

1. Let them choose
2. Snack attack
3. Fuel imagination
4. Time to try

Child packing their own lunchbox

1. Let them choose

Before we start thinking about the filling, let's look at the lunchbox itself. By letting your child choose their own lunchbox they will be more interested in filling it for themselves. They’ll be proud of their choice and want to show it off at school - you just need to guide them on how to fill it with healthy options.

Make sure they know about the Healthy Harold lunchboxes - they'll act as an additional reminder while preparing lunch.

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2. Snack attack

Interactive food ideas are great snack choices. Like any learning, hands-on experiences often achieve better results. Get in the kitchen together and create a healthy cheese dip or roast vegetable hummus, cut up some vegies or grab some crackers for finger food fun. The tortilla egg cups, below, are easy for kids to make and perfect for the lunchbox.

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3. Feeding imaginations

Make healthy eating fun! Give children the freedom to use their creativity and get them thinking about foods of different shapes and colours they can include in their lunchboxes. Different ways of presenting foods can inspire children to try (and keep eating) them. Try apple doughnuts 3 ways – they’re healthier than normal doughnuts, delicious and fun to make or this easy sandwich on a stick recipe.

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4. Time to try

"No" is something we get used to hearing when offering new food  – sometimes without our children even trying them. By introducing new foods in a snack or lunch, rather than in a weeknight meal at the end of a long day, children may be more inclined to at least nibble before making up their mind. Their interest will also be sparked if they help make it. As a start, try these easy banana, oat & sesame balls.