Identifying and expressing emotions

Children experience a wide array of emotions throughout the day but haven’t developed the ability to identify what these emotions are. One of the best ways to boost emotional intelligence in your child is to talk more about emotions.  The following activities can help you do this.

Emotions scale

This could be a visual scale (much like a measuring chart) where emotions are recorded from the feelings they like the least to the feelings they like the most. Make this activity extra fun by turning it into an arts and crafts challenge

Emotional scale for children and parents

A chart like this not only helps your child to learn the names of feelings and how to identify them but also that emotions have a natural progression. For example, boredom may be higher than sadness, so even though your child may still feel a little stuck at least they can visually understand that their emotions are rising.

Charades with emotions

Healthy Harold loves playing games

Similar to a normal game of charades using emotions instead of movies, books or tv shows. Keep the emotions simple such as happy, sad, angry, sick and brave. This game is a great way to have fun while also teaching your child how important facial expressions and body language are when recognising different emotions in themselves and others.

Find a feeling activity

Find a feeling

Children love a challenge. Complete this find a word activity with your child and talk about the emotions you find.

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